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Echoing the Story

The sixth and final story in our series of “Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs” is Mark’s “feeding of the 4,000” story, an echo of the Manna story. To the disciples’ misguided question, “How can anyone feed these people in the desert?” Jesus offers a better question: “What do you have?” That may be the best response to all of our misguided questions.

Echoing the Story: The Last Supper

The fifth story in our series of “Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs” is the story of the Last Supper, when Jesus and the twelve reenact the Passover story. It is there that Jesus says, “One of you will betray me.” Yet, even in that betrayal, God was at work redeeming the world.

Living the Story: Memory and Justice

The fourth story in our series of “Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs” is a command that the people of Israel received while still on their journey. It looked forward to a day when they would be prosperous, with the warning, “Do not forget that you were once a slave.” The memory will show them how to live with justice and compassion.

Resuming the Story

The third story in our series of “Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs” is the occasion when the people of Israel crossed over into the Promised Land and began observing the Feast of Unleavened Bread. At that point, the Manna stopped and they became able to provide for themselves.

Trusting the Story

The second story in our series of “Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs” is the story of the Manna, “Bread from heaven,” which was a gift and a test in response to the people’s murmuring.

Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs

The first story in our series of “Following a Trail of Bread Crumbs” is the Passover story of unleavened bread. It is bread meant to be eaten in a posture of being ready for God’s great liberative act.

For and Against

Two fundamentally dispositions about others are scribed out by the biblical texts, one of which says, “Whoever is not for us is against us,” and the other says,
“Whoever is not against us is for us.” The second offers us a disposition of openness and Christlikeness.

They Were Silent

They say “Silence is golden,” but when the disciples have nothing to say as Jesus asks, “What were you talking about along the road?” it was the silence of shame. They had been arguing over who was the greatest. It raises the question, “What have we been talking about along the road?” Our greatness or the cross?

Cross Words

When Jesus discloses his journey to the cross for the first time, Peter takes him aside and rebukes him in order to silence him. Jesus’ response is withering, because Peter is determined to make Jesus a great Caesar-like Messiah, instead of a victim of the cross.

More than Crumbs

Gregory of Nyssa once said, “Sin the failure to grow.” When Jesus is confronted by a Syro-Phoenician woman, his cultural box has a chance to be enlarged. And, with her insistence, Jesus grows.